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Is flaring (burning) of gas in the Queensland gas fields safe for the people living there

Eligibility - Queensland residents

Principal Petitioner:

Leanne Brummell
30 Victoria Street

Total Signatures - 171

Sponsoring Member: Rob Pyne MP

Posting Date: 24/08/2017

Tabled Date: 24/08/2017

Responded By: Hon Cameron Dick MP on 18/09/2017

TO: The Honourable the Speaker and Members of the Legislative Assembly of Queensland

Queensland residents draw to the attention of the House that poisonous emissions are occurring due to flaring in the
Queensland gas fields and the small number of people living there are exposed to such. Although a number of flaring sites are monitored and soil, air and water testing has occurred periodically, there has been no toxicology testing of residents who live near the vicinity of gas infrastructure.

In light of research published this year by Angela K Werner, Kerrianne Watt, Cate M Cameron, Sue Vink, Andrew Page and Paul Jagals we demand the Queensland Government prove that Queensland gas field residents are not sick due to exposure to toxic chemicals. Their research found strong associations for blood/immune diseases in CSG residents when it compared hospitalisation rates of residents living In either a CSG, mining or rural setting and concluded that their results suggest further investigation is warranted, It confirms Dr Geralyn McCarron's 2013 study that has previously been submitted to the Government. In a 2016 Senate enquiry which identified nosebleeds, headaches, sore throats, metallic tastes, rashes and more serious illnesses such as cancer in a Queensland CSG area.

Your petitioners, therefore, request the House to ensure that all residents of the current Queensland gas fields receive, as a matter of urgency, personal exposure and biological monitoring that tests for flaring chemicals including, but not limited to VOCs, PAHs, ozone, nitrous oxide, hydrogen sulphide, radon and unburned hydrocarbons.